photoCookbook’s today offer so many unique angles and specialties, it is with unabashed excitement each time I pause to unearth another treasure—-fresh from the bindery!  Jeffrey Weiss is the author of this treat Charcuteria: The Soul of Spain (March, 2014). It is a 450 pound gorilla of a book—-filled with prose, interviews, recipes, gritty photography, and more tips and tricks than I have seen in some time.

The book’s forward is by James Beard Award laureate Jose Andres, stunning photos are by Nathan Rawlinson, and there are even some amusing illustrations drawn by Spanish born Sergioi Mora.

What is so special about this collection is the amazing trek that Jeffrey took to compile the contents of this cookbook. You see, Jeffrey was a recipient of ICEX’s prestigious Spanish Gastronomy Training Scholarship, which allowed him to travel throughout Spain, learning its regional cuisines from specialty chefs, and cooking everywhere from humble farms to swanky restaurants.

The book delves into the history and techniques behind authentic Spanish butchering and meat-curing. It features more than 100 comprehensive recipes, and truly “celebrates” this type of cuisine. Now, for those cookbook lovers who require everything to be outlined down to the tiniest detail of a grain of salt, this book is not for you. Jeffrey’s recipes offer a percentage, or ratio of meats and other ingredients to the other delicacies on the platter. It is relatively easy once you get the hang of it, and quite a creative way to communicate a recipe. It is forgiving. It is actually freeing for those of us who love to cook.

For those readers who enjoy actually doing the fermentation, smoking and drying, and grinding of meats, you are in luck. The book outlines all of this, and offers close up pictures to reinforce what the chefs are demonstrating. For those who would prefer to use this as a guide, and purchase your choice meats, you can easily do that as well. The book is very flexible for all types of cooks and that is a real treat. To break the presentation down to make it simple—follow Jeffrey’s five tips:

1)      Select your Meats- Think about color, consistency, and texture in addition to the flavors

2)      Select Complementary Cheeses- Strong and creamy—mild and hard.

3)      Gather Condiments- From olive oil, to almonds, dried fruits, olives, marmalade, & membrillo- the guava paste eaten with Manchego.

4)      Add Bread- such as Ciabatta with a crunchy texture.

5)      Pair with Wines- Give thought to this and let the meats drive the decisions.

 

Sourcing the products can be a challenge, but once found you will have your “go to” resources to use at a moment’s notice. For those in Southern California, here are two suggestions: La Espanola- Harbor City (310) 539-0455 and Ole Spain Deli Shop- Santa Ana (714) 966-1087.

Jeffrey Weiss has set down roots in Monterey, CA and is the Executive Chef for Jeninni Kitchen+Wine Bar. We look forward to meeting up with him when we are there in Pacific Grove inmid-August!  They open each evening for happy hour at 4:00 and dinner at 5:00 until close… Jeninni Kitchen+Wine Bar ~ 542 Lighthouse Ave, Pacific Grove, CA 93950 ~ 831) 920-2662  www.jeninni.com .

Agate, the Publisher of this fine cookbook, has kindly offered to share three recipes with us and also sub-recipes, if you will, for alternatives. Please enjoy exploring these recipes as a sampler of what is offered in this wonderful cookbook. This includes: BACALAO EN SALSA VERDE, BOLLO PREÑAO (a bagel dog), and PERUNILLAS (cookies).

Enjoy!

photo back cover

 

RECIPES

 

BACALAO EN SALSA VERDE

Of all of the Basque preparations for bacalao, this version is hands

down my favorite since it’s a great example of the New Basque cuisine

that swept through Basque kitchens in the 1970s and 1980s. Back then,

great chefs like Juan Mari Arzak and Pedro Subijana—guys who were

influenced by the nouvelle cuisine movement of France—put on events

akin to today’s pop-up restaurants with the goal of steering Basque

cooking away from its heavy, butter-fortified sauces in favor of lighter

preparations that were more ingredient driven.

 

This dish is a great example of what they were getting at. The original

salsa verde recipe for this dish calls for the same technique used to make

a classic velouté, essentially thickening fish fumet with a heavy roux

before finishing everything with chopped herbs.

 

By comparison, the updated version I learned from some Basque

friends features a cleaner and lighter sauce that lets the ingredients

do the talking. In this recipe, a little flour lightly thickens the sauce.

The flour binds the oil and water with the fish’s natural gelatin, which

is released using a swirling technique like the one used to make pil pil

sauce. As a result, the dish is really light and fresh, especially with the

addition of herbs and lemon. YIELD: 4 servings.

 

Ingredients:

FOR REHYDRATING AND

COOKING THE BACALAO:

2.2 pounds (1 kg) Bacalao

(see sub-recipe below), skin on

and cut into 4 large squares

W ater, to cover

1/4 cup (60 mL) extra virgin olive oil

All-purpose flour, as needed

Kosher salt, to taste

Freshly ground black pepper, to taste

 

FOR THE HERB SAUCE:

4 whole cloves garlic, peeled,

destemmed, and minced

Generous pinch kosher salt

1/4 cup (15 g) minced fresh flat-leaf parsley

2 tablespoons (5 g) minced fresh chives

2 tablespoons (5 g) minced fresh chervil

 

FOR THE SALSA VERDE:

1 medium yellow onion, destemmed

and minced

Kosher salt, to taste

P inch red pepper flakes

20 littleneck clams, scrubbed

1/2 cup (120 mL) Spanish white wine,

such as Verdejo

Juice and zest of 1 lemon

Freshly ground black pepper, to taste

 

TO REHYDRATE AND COOK THE BACALAO:

1 In a large mixing bowl, cover the Bacalao with the water. Soak in the

refrigerator for 1 day, changing the water at least twice during the

soaking period.

2 Remove the Bacalao from the water and pat it dry. Reserve 1/2 cup

(120 mL) of the soaking liquid. Set aside.

3 In a medium skillet over medium–high heat, warm the oil for 4 to 5

minutes, until just rippling. Line a plate with 2 to 3 paper towels and

set aside.

4 In a shallow bowl, season the flour with the salt and black pepper.

Dredge each of the pieces of Bacalao in the flour, shaking oâ any

excess flour.

5 Sear the Bacalao in the skillet for 2 to 3 minutes on each side, until

golden brown. Remove from the heat. Remove the Bacalao pieces

from the skillet and place them on the lined plate to drain. Cover

with foil and set aside. Reserve the oil in the skillet.

 

TO MAKE THE HERB SAUCE:

1 In a mortar and pestle, crush together the garlic and salt to form an ajosal. If desired, you can finish the

ajosal in a food processor fitted with the “S” blade.

2 Add the parsley, chives, and chervil to the ajosal and continue crushing or processing until a rough green

paste forms. Drizzle in the reserved Bacalao soaking water and continue crushing or processing until the

paste becomes a somewhat thick sauce. Set aside.

TO MAKE THE SALSA VERDE AND THE FINISHED DISH:

1 Add the onions to the skillet and season them with the salt. Place the skillet over medium–high heat and

sweat the onions in the oil for 10 minutes, until they are soft but have not taken on color.

2 Add the red pepper flakes, clams, and wine to the skillet. Cover the pan and bring the liquid to a boil.

Reduce the heat to medium and simmer, covered, for 6 to 10 minutes, until the clams are just ready to open.

Remove from the heat.

3 Add the Bacalao and the Herb Sauce to the skillet. Begin whisking the sauce in the skillet, while at the same

time shaking and swirling the pan, until a creamy emulsion begins to form as with a pil pil sauce.

4 Transfer the clams and Bacalao to a serving platter. Add the lemon juice to the skillet. Taste and reseason

the sauce as necessary with the salt.

5 Pour the sauce over the clams and Bacalao. Top with the black pepper and lemon zest. Serve warm.

 

SUB-RECIPE: BACALAO

If there’s one cured food that can give the Ibérico pig a run for

its money in a Spanish popularity contest, it’s bacalao. Salted

cod has a long history in Spain, dating back almost 500 years

to a time when Basque whalers, who traditionally preserved

whale fat and flesh with salt, decided to try the same process

with cod. The process worked out well, and a Spanish culinary

star was born.

Bacalao’s place on Spanish dining tables was later solidified

when the Catholic Church declared it a favorite protein

substitute during meat fasting days and Lent. Since the

number of days that Spaniards were forbidden from eating

meat totaled almost half the calendar year, the bacalao trade

boomed on those days and the humble cod eventually became

a religious icon.

Not only was bacalao essential to trade and the sustenance

of nations, but the act of salting cod actually makes the

fish taste better by compacting it and changing its flavor

profile—a technique that also works well for other fish. As

Harold McGee points out in his book On Food and Cooking:

Micrococcus bacteria generate flavor [in the salted fish] by

producing free amino acids and TMA; and oxygen breaks up

to half the very small amount of fatty substances into free

fatty acids and then into a range of smaller molecules that

also contribute to aroma.”

Sadly, according to the Seafood Watch Program at the

Monterey Bay Aquarium, stocks of Northwest Atlantic

cod (specifically Georges Bank cod) have been drastically

overfished, almost to the point of collapse. Fortunately, Gulf of

Maine and Northeast Atlantic cod stocks are still fairly strong.

Look for them, and specifically make sure that the fish was

caught with a hook and line, as opposed to trawling. Trawling is

a bad business that messes with marine habitats.

Lesson of the day: Protect the planet, amigos…safe fishing

means more delicious fishies for years to come.

Ingredients: 

17½ ounces (500 g) Basic Salazón

(see sub-recipe below)

 

1 Cut the cod loins into 1-inch-thick (2.5-cm-thick) pieces. Weigh each piece to obtain a green weight; record

the weights for later.

2 Place the Basic Salazón in a small mixing bowl. Set aside.

3 Line a baking sheet with parchment paper. Place the cod loin pieces on the baking sheet. Sprinkle both

sides of the pieces with about 1/2 of the salazón, pressing down hard to compact the cure into the cod. Cover

the bowl containing the remainder of the salazón and reserve.

4 Wrap the cod loin pieces in a layer of cheesecloth. Either attach a sanitized hook to one end of each piece or

tie butcher’s twine around each piece and make a loop for hanging.

5 Hang the cod loin pieces in a drying chamber with excellent airflow. The temperature should be set at 54°F

to 60°F (12°C to 16°C) and the relative humidity should be 80% to 85%. The loins should hang over a large

bowl to catch any water that drips from the fish, and the water that accumulates in the bowl should be

drained daily. Dry the loins in the chamber for 2 days.

6 Unwrap the cheesecloth from the loins and apply the remaining salazón to them. Rewrap the loins and

rehang them in the drying chamber for 1 day, until they have lost about 50% of their green weight (with

good airflow in the chamber, this will take about 1 day per inch (2.5 cm) of thickness on a loin).

7 Before using the Bacalao, you must soak the pieces in a few changes of water for 24 to 36 hours. Serve in

salads such as Esqueixada (see recipe on p. 173), or use in the Basque Bacalao recipes on pp. 124, 163, 165,

and 167.

 

Sub-recipe:  BASIC SALAZÓN

Using a salazón is the most basic trick in the charcutier’s playbook:

It’s just a salt rub + meat + time. Pure salt can be a little harsh, though.

That’s why I use a little sugar in my salazón—for balance.

Much like the salmuera, the salazón serves as a preserving agent,

extracting water or blood while killing o‰ not-so-friendly bacteria

found on the surface of most meats. In addition, the salazón can play

a vital role in changing the texture of some meat and fish, thereby

improving flavor while also extending shelf life.

For example, in Andalucía, we often placed fresh loins of merluza

(called hake in the United States) in a salazón of salt and some toasted

spices for exactly 18 minutes. While the amount of time might seem

inconsequential, this precise curing time delivered fish with denser,

meatier flesh that required no additional seasoning. And when you have

very fresh fish like that Andalucían merluza—fish that came o‰ the boat

literally hours before we cooked it—the best culinary rule to follow is

that the less you screw with your product, the better. YIELD: 10 ounces (280 g) dry cure

 

Ingredients

71/2 ounces (210 g)

coarse sea salt

21/2 ounces (70 g)

granulated sugar

 

1 In a small mixing bowl, combine the salt and sugar.

2 Transfer the resulting salazón to a foodsafe ziptop bag or container

and store at room temperature until ready to use.

 

_____________________________

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

BOLLO PREÑAO

If a Spaniard was going to make a bagel dog, this would be it.

Essentially a baguette “impregnated” with a chistorra or small

chorizo sausage (pan preñao is also called pan embarazado—

literally translated as “pregnant bread”), these little beauties

are a common and welcome sight after long Madrid evenings

of imbibing that bleed into early Madrid mornings of

impending hangover.

 

You can also swing a cheat on these if you are not the breadbaking

sort: In a pinch, make bollos with everything from pizza

dough to that unmentionable popping “dough in a can.”  YIELD: 7 servings.

 

111/2 ounces (325 g) warm water ..

3/4 teaspoon (3 g) instant or

active dry yeast

3/4 teaspoon (5 g) honey

11/2 teaspoons (6 g)

granulated sugar

1/2 ounce (15 g) kosher salt,

plus more to taste

O live oil, for greasing

7 Chistorra or Cantimpalos-Style Chorizo

(see recipes below)

1 cup (240 mL) water

 

1 In the bowl of a stand mixer fitted with the whisk

attachment, mix together the water, yeast, honey, and

sugar on low speed for 2 to 3 minutes. Set aside at room

temperature for 10 minutes, until the yeast blooms and

gets foamy.

2 Replace the whisk attachment with the dough hook

attachment. Add the flour to the bowl and knead on

medium speed for 1 minute, until the dough forms a shaggy

mass. If the dough is too sticky, add a little flour; if it is not

sticky enough, add a little more water. Let the dough rest in

the bowl to hydrate for 30 minutes at room temperature.

3 Add the salt and continue kneading on medium speed

for 5 to 10 minutes, until the masa is smooth, elastic, and

bounces back immediately when pressed with a finger.

4 Using the olive oil, lightly grease a large mixing bowl. Place

the dough ball in the bowl and cover with a damp cloth.

Let it rise in a warm place for 30 minutes, until it roughly

doubles in size.

5 Remove the dough from the bowl. Punch it down and divide

it into 7 equal-sized sections (each roughly 41/4 ounces

[120 g]). Form each section into a barra (baguette) shape

slightly longer than the sausages, and place the barras onto

a baking sheet or wood board. Re-cover the barras with the

damp cloth, and set aside for 20 to 30 minutes until the

dough is relaxed and proofed by double.

6 Take a barra, make a deep slit in the middle of it, and lay 1 of the sausages inside. Pinch the dough around

the sausage, crimping together the sides of dough and completely sealing it. Repeat for all of the remaining

barras.

7 Place the bollos on a floured cloth or piece of baker’s canvas. Cover with a clean cloth, and set aside to

ferment the bollos for 20 minutes, or until they have risen slightly.

8 Preheat the oven to 450°F (230°C) for at least 30 minutes, making sure 2 racks are in the oven. Place a

ceramic baking stone on the top shelf and place a cast iron pan, baking pan, or second ceramic baking stone

on the bottom rack.

9 Remove the cloth from the bollos, then place them onto the top ceramic baking stone in the oven (you can

also roll the bollos onto a floured board or pizza peel to transfer them to the oven). Immediately pour the

water into the pan or stone on the bottom rack and quickly shut the door. (The water will create steam to

help the bread rise.)

10 Bake the bollos for 15 minutes, until they are golden brown. Remove from the oven and cool for 10 to 20

minutes on a rack. Serve warm.

 

SUB RECIPE: CHISTORRA

Chistorra is the redheaded stepchild of the Spanish sausage world—

underappreciated, misunderstood, and virtually unheard of outside of its

native País Vasco and Navarra. Maybe that’s because it’s one of the only

semicured sausages in the Spanish arsenal. But for that same reason, it’s

the perfect gateway drug to the addictive world of dry-cured meat.

The recipe begins by creating a masa similar to the one used in Chorizo

Fresco, with the addition of a fermentation agent. This natural bacterial

culture inoculates the sausage with the sort of friends needed for a

quick lactic acid fermentation. Basically, the fermentation culture

lowers the pH of the sausage, giving it a nice, acidic tang.

I learned to make this recipe using only 100% pork, but depending on

which region of País Vasco a Chistorra comes from, it might be made

from beef or various blends of pork and beef. Feel free to change it up a

little—just know your meat and where it comes from.

YIELD: About 8–10 loops or 16–20 links of sausage per 2.2 pounds (1 kg) of meat

 

Ingredients

1¾ ounces (10 g) F-RM-52 culture

(see p. 94)

½ cup (100 mL) distilled water

Á ounce (10 g) minced garlic

Õ ounce (20 g) kosher salt

Í ounce (5 g) dextrose

Í ounce (2.4 g) TCM #1 or DQ #1

curing salt mix (see p. 83)

¼ cup (50 mL) dry white wine,

such as Verdejo, chilled

¼ cup (50 mL) water, chilled

Á ounce (10 g) pimentón dulce

Á ounce (10 g) pimentón picante

3 tablespoons (45 mL) extra virgin

olive oil, for frying, divided

2 feet (60 cm) 1–1Ö⁄ËÌ-inch (24–26-mm)

lamb casings, soaked, or more as needed

 

1 Place the cabecero, panceta, and papada meats and grinder parts in

the freezer for 30 minutes to par-freeze before attempting to grind.

2 In a small mixing bowl, combine the F-RM-52 culture and the

distilled water, making a slurry. Set aside for a minimum of 10

minutes at room temperature to bloom.

3 Using a mortar and pestle, crush together the garlic and salt to form

an ajosal. If desired, you can finish the ajosal in a food processor

fitted with the “S” blade.

4 In a mixing bowl, combine the meats with the ajosal, dextrose, and

curing salt. Toss together and set aside as you set up the grinder.

5 Fill a large bowl with ice, and place a smaller bowl inside the icefilled

bowl. Grind the cabecero, panceta, and papada meats once

through a medium-coarse (Ç inch [9.5 mm]) die into the smaller

bowl. Be careful: The meat mixture is wet, so it may squirt and pop

out of the grinder. Return the ground meat to the freezer for 15 to 20

minutes, until it is par-frozen.

6 Grind the cabecero, panceta, and papada meats again through a

medium (¼ inch [6 mm]) die into the same bowl over ice.

7 In a small mixing bowl, combine the wine, water, and pimentones,

making a slurry. Keep the bowl containing the slurry chilled until

ready to use.

 

Sub-recipe: CANTIMPALOS-STYLE CHORIZO

This classic, dry-cured chorizo hangs close to the heart of every

Spaniard. It’s the pimentón-and-garlic-spiked ambassador most

associated with the embutidos of Spain.

 

Nearly every Spanish region has its own chorizo; this one is closely

related to the very famous and IGP-protected chorizo of Cantimpalos, a

small municipality located in Castilla y León. Chorizo there is found in

three sizes: sarta, the smallest, cured around 20 days; achorizado, the

classic U-shaped next size up, with a curing time of around 24 days; and

cular, the largest, which is stu‰ed in a pork bung and needs to be cured

around 40 days.

 

YIELD

Sarta: 8–10 loops of sausage

per 2.2 pounds (1 kg);

Achorizado: 3–4 loops of

sausage per 2.2 pounds (1 kg);

Cular: 1 cular per 2.2 pounds

(1 kg) 

 

Ingredients 

¼ ounce (10 g) T-SPX culture

(see p. 94)

½ cup (100 mL) distilled water

Á ounce (10 g) minced garlic

¾ ounce (24 g) kosher salt

Í ounce (3 g) dextrose

Í ounce (3 g) granulated sugar

Í ounce (2.4 g) Instacure #2

or DQ #2 curing salt mix

(see p. 83) …………………………….. .24%

¼ cup (50 mL) dry white wine,

such as Verdejo, chilled

Õ ounce (20 g) pimentón dulce ………..2%

Í ounce (2 g) dried oregano ………….. .2%

For Sarta: 2 feet (60 cm) 1–1Á-inch

(25–35-mm) hog casings, soaked, or more

as needed; for Achorizado: 2 feet (60 cm)

1¼–2-inch (30–50-mm) hog casings,

soaked, or more as needed; for Cular:

1 pork bung, soaked

 

1 Place the meats, tocino, and grinder parts in the freezer for 30

minutes to par-freeze before attempting to grind. In a small mixing

bowl, combine the T-SPX culture and the distilled water, making a

slurry. Set aside for a minimum of 10 minutes at room temperature

to bloom.

2 Using a mortar and pestle, crush together the garlic and salt to form

an ajosal. If desired, you can finish the ajosal in a food processor

fitted with the “S” blade.

3 In a mixing bowl, combine the ajosal, dextrose, sugar, and curing

salt. Divide the mixture in half.

4 Add half of the ajosal mixture to the cabacero meat and tocino. Toss

together. In a separate bowl, mix the papada with the other half of

the ajosal mixture. Set the mixtures aside in the refrigerator to chill

as you set up the grinder.

Since this style of chorizo can come in di‰erent casing sizes, note

that the grind will vary depending on the size you are shooting for.

TO MAKE CHORIZO SARTA OR ACHORIZADO:

1 Fill a large bowl with ice. Place a smaller bowl inside the ice-filled

bowl. Grind the cabecero meat and tocino mixture once through a

medium-coarse (Ç inch [9.5 mm]) die into the smaller bowl. Be

careful: The meat mixture is wet, so it may squirt and pop out of the

grinder.

2 Grind the papada through a medium (¼ inch [6 mm]) die and

combine with the cabecero meat and tocino mixture for mixing.

 

TO MAKE CHORIZO CULAR:

1 Fill a large bowl with ice. Place a smaller bowl inside the ice-filled bowl. Grind the cabecero meat and tocino

mixture once through a coarse (¾ inch [19 mm]) die into the smaller bowl. Be careful: The meat mixture is

wet, so it may squirt and pop out of the grinder.

2 Grind the papada through a medium-coarse (Ç inch [9.5 mm]) die and combine with the cabecero meat

and tocino mixture for mixing.

TO FINISH THE CHORIZO:

1 In a small mixing bowl, combine the wine, pimentón, and oregano, making a slurry. Keep the bowl

containing the slurry chilled until ready to use.

2 Place the ground meats in the bowl of a stand mixer fitted with the paddle attachment (or you can just mix

in a mixing bowl with a wooden spoon). Begin mixing on low speed. As the mixer runs, pour the wine slurry

into the bowl in a steady stream.

3 Continue mixing on medium speed for 1 to 2 minutes, until the wine slurry has been fully incorporated into

the mixture, a white residue forms on the sides of the bowl, and the mixture firms up.

4 Reduce the mixer speed to low and add the T-SPX slurry. Continue mixing for 1 minute, until the T-SPX

slurry is fully incorporated into the mixture. Place the bowl containing the ground meat mixture in the

refrigerator to keep it cold until you are ready to stu‰ the sausage into casings.

5 To make chorizo sarta or achorizada: Stu‰ the sarta or achorizado into the casings and tie into 12-inch (30-

cm) loops, ending both with a butterfly knot series and a loop for hanging.

To make chorizo cular: Stu‰ and tie the cular as you would a morcón or sobrasada, using string to tie it o‰

with a butterfly knot and bubble knot series and ending with a loop at one end for hanging (this type of

sausage is not prepared as links; see p. 90 in Chapter 3 for illustrations and directions).

Using a sterile pin or sausage pricker, prick each sausage several times. Weigh each sausage to obtain a

green weight; record the weights and tag each sausage with its green weight.

6 Ferment the sausages in a drying chamber set at 65°F to 80°F (18.3°C to 26.6°C) and 85% to 90% relative

humidity for 2 to 3 days. Check the pH of the meat (see p. 95) to ensure that the level has dropped below 5.3

before the third day of drying.

7 Hang the sausages in a drying chamber set at 54°F to 60°F (12°C to 16°C) and 80% to 85% relative

humidity for 1 to 2 months, until the sausages have lost about 35% of their green weight. (For the sarta

and achorizado, this will take about 1 month; for the cular, it will take 1½ to 2 months.) At that point, the

sausages will be ready to consume.

__________________________

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

–PERUNILLAS

I’ll admit it: I’m a bit of an elitist about cookies. Oatmeal raisin cookies

are just granola bars with delusions of grandeur; peanut butter needs

some chunks to be worthwhile; and the King of All Cookies will always

be warm chocolate chip laced with sea salt. As for those dainty little

fucking Frenchie macarons pronounced with a phlegm-y middle

consonant, like you’re about to pass a hairball…is their 15 minutes up

yet? Please?

When the sabias at our matanza baked these delicate lemon and

cinnamon cookies with Ibérico lard, I couldn’t help but get excited.

They’re crumbly, rich, and make for life-altering results. Chocolate

chip: Consider yourself on notice. YIELD: Around 1 dozen cookies

 

Ingredients

14 ounces (400 g) manteca (pork lard),

preferably Ibérico, plus more for

greasing, softened

101/2 ounces (300 g) granulated sugar,

plus more for sprinkling

4 whole large eggs, yolks and whites

separated into bowls

1/4 cup (50 mL) aguardiente or aniseflavored

liqueur

Juice and zest of 1 lemon

28 ounces (800 g) unbleached

all-purpose flour

1 tablespoon (10 g) kosher salt

1 tablespoon (15 g) baking powder

1 tablespoon (7 g) ground cinnamon

 

1 In a large mixing bowl, cream together the manteca and sugar until the mixture resembles a fluây little

pork cloud.

2 One by one, whisk the egg yolks into the manteca–sugar mixture. (Place the bowl containing the egg whites

in the refrigerator for later use.) Whisk in the aguardiente, lemon juice, and lemon zest until thoroughly

combined. Set aside.

3 In another mixing bowl, sift together the flour, salt, baking powder, and cinnamon.

4 While whisking constantly, add the dry-ingredient mixture, bit by bit, to the wet-ingredient mixture until a

smooth dough forms.

5 On a clean work surface, roll the dough into a ball.

6 Preheat the oven to 400°F (200°C). Grease a baking sheet with some manteca.

7 Break oâ pieces of the dough weighing about 31/2 ounces (100 g) each. Roll each piece into a ball and press

lightly, forming them into 2-inch to 3-inch (5-cm to 8-cm) wide discs.

8 Place each disc on the prepared baking sheet. Brush with the egg whites and sprinkle a little sugar over the

top of each disc.

9 Bake for 15 to 20 minutes, rotating the baking sheet halfway through baking, until the cookies are golden

brown. Remove from the oven and set aside on a rack to cool.

10 Serve warm or store for up to 4 days in a sealed container.

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